Jet Lagged and Delirious – Paris.France – December.2012

Where did the time go?  It seemed like only yesterday that we were in Paris, and now I sit at home (windy and rainy, just like Paris, btw), reminiscing the past two weeks that I will probably categorize as one of my most memorable trips.  There’s something about Paris, and although I don’t like to fall into any cliche’s, “Paris is always a good idea.”

Here’s what I remember a week later:  After a day and a half of traveling, we finally reach Paris and get to our apartment near Montmartre (https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/699014).  I ooh’d and ahh’d over the cuteness of the place – the pictures on the website doesn’t do it much justice.  The bathroom was tiny, but at least the apartment had one, and Jay said, “there’s no t.v.”, not that we could’ve understood, but at least we could pass the time, and maybe pick up on the language?  Overall, it sufficed for our two weeks in Paris.

That night we used Yelp to find us a place for dinner and ended up at Chez Ginette – walking distance on 101 rue Caulaincourt.  I think we were too jet lagged and hungry to think about taking pictures.  Of course, I ordered the duck and remembered it in French too – canard.  Unfortunately, they were out of duck.  Just my luck, no duck.  So I went with one of the specials, which was chicken.  Jay had the risotto.  I don’t particularly like white meat chicken, but this was one of the best chickens I had.  Maybe because I was hungry?  Maybe because I was already drunk from the wine?  Whatever it was, it was tasty.  And so was Jay’s risotto.

The next day we slept in and decided to explore the 1eme, but ended up in the 9th and 2nd as well.  We had intended to explore one or two arrondissement a day, but as we explored, we realized it was nearly impossible to do that.  For the first day, though, I wanted to see the covered passages that I read about in my tour book and followed a suggested route. The result was us spending more time trying to figure out where we were than enjoying the sights around us.

We started off at Passage Jouffroy, which was Paris’ last major passage in 1847 and took a peek at Passage Verdeau to the north. Walking back down, we walked through Passage des Panoramas, and Passage Choiseul. We then came to Galerie Colbert and Galerie Vivienne. I can’t remember details, and don’t remember one from the other. The only store we stopped at was one called Rickshaw (an antique store selling cool things like door knobs and gas lanterns, but nothing under 5EUR) and I can’t remember which passage it was located at!

One of the entrances to one of the passages.

One of the entrances to one of the passages.

nice holiday deco

nice holiday deco

The cool antiques store.

The cool antiques store.

We also found ourselves at Rue Montorgueil. There were stores and markets along with butcher shops on a pedestrian only street, which was nice as we didn’t have to dodge the crowd. It is also nicely lit up for the Christmas season.

At the top of Rue Montorgueil

At the top of Rue Montorgueil

We also stumbled across Forum des Halles, an underground shopping mall just south of rue Montorgueil.  I hate shopping in cold weather because you’re wearing so many layers.  And I can spend a couple of hours shopping, so that means lugging around the layers.  Then trying on clothes makes it even more of a chore.  So I try to avoid going shopping, unless I see something really cute that makes up for all that nonsense.

the entrance to the the underground shopping mall

the entrance to the the underground shopping mall

Somehow and at sometime, we ended up at the Jardin du Palais Royale.  Gardens in Paris are beautiful, even when there’s no leaves and the trees are bare.  Mental note:  We will be back in the Fall.

some guys playing ball

some guys playing ball

For dinner we ended up in the 6eme, at this place we had vaguely recalled from our research called La Palette (43 Rue de Seine). However, when we sat down and handed a menu, we realized this place was for drinking. Reading our notes back at the apartment, it was a recommended cafe, not restaurant. We ordered our drinks – I had the Mojito Lovers and Jay had a beer called Gundenberger Blanche, both were exceptionally good, though a bit pricey. The Mojito was 11,50 EUR! After finishing our drinks we asked for a dinner recommendation. The waiter led us to Peres et Filles (81 Rue de Seine). The food was okay, so no pictures were taken.

We went to check out the bridge, Pont des Arts, nicknamed “Lover’s Bridge”.  I had brought over a lock and key engraved with our intials (“awww, so cute!”) so we could “lock” our love in Paris.  I knew it would be too dark to take good photos, but there were two bridges (the other being Pont d’Archeveche) and I wanted to check both out before we committed.

Look at all the locks!

Look at all the locks!

We also stumbled across this place – Maison Georges Larnicol (132 bd Saint-Germain).  Jay had walked passed the window, saw a crowd and these things – “kouignettes”.  We decided to buy a few for our breakfast the next morning.  Now that I Google these things, it’s a pastry from Brittany (Jay wanted to take a day trip there – maybe next time), and delicious!

Maison Georges Larnicol

Maison Georges Larnicol

choosing some kouignettes

choosing some kouignettes

After a long day we headed home. I thought I’d be drunk and tired enough to pass out, but didn’t get to sleep until nearly 3am! Jet lag sucks, especially when the time difference is 11 hours!

French words that we learned that day:  We asked a waitress how to order tap water in which she responded, “Du Lu”, which I KNOW I did not spell correctly.   So we’ve been saying, “Du Lu s’il vous plait” but now that I’m Googling, I’m not seeing that?  Were we just being dumb Americans?  Oh well, we’ve been getting what we wanted.  Except that one time in La Palette where Jay accidently said, “Du Lait s’il vous plait” which translated into “milk please”.  Good thing the waiter questioned him, or he’d have a glass of milk with his beer!

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